Assabet Afternoons

TM9348 Assabet River Afternoon #2 7×7 oil on paper

I’ve been visiting the banks of the Assabet River occasionally, enjoying its meanders and charm. These four oil studies show the transition that happens every. The first is from early September, the following three are resplendently late September and October. Enjoy.

TM9347 Assabet River Afternoon #1 7×7 oil on paper

TM9349 Assabet River Afternoon #3 7×7 oil on paper

TM9346 Hello October! 7×7 oil on paper

Watersides

TM9341 Gloucester Quarry 7×7 oil on paper

TM9342 Stopping by the Pond 7×7 oil on paper

These two mirrored compositions with still water and reflections are a delight to paint. The “other” world, upside down and mysterious, needs to be convincing but not fussy. I used a palette knife plus a little brushwork to find the forms. The colors are less saturated – by September the greens start to look a bit tired, as if they really can’t wait to get the dressed up again in gold and yellow. Enjoy.

New England Coastline #12

TM9331 New England Coastline #12 7×7 oil on paper

The scarred fingers of ledge reaching into the water at Bass Rocks are such a gorgeous color – all ocher and red oxide, not like the grey granite found toward the middle of the state, or like the maroon, black, and deep mars violet cliffs you can find up north between Lubec, Maine and New Brunswick, Canada. So much color and geometry, so little time! Enjoy.

New England Coastline #10

TM9331 New England Coastline #10 7×7 oil on paper

It’s important to remember that something as apparently soft as water can take down a mountain. New England’s geological past included mountains that could vie with the Alps. All it takes is a few Ice Ages and a lot of weather and time to render that mountain into fractured headlands or shifting sand dunes. Isn’t it amazing?

New Engalnd Coastline #9

TM9330 New England Coastline #9 7×7 oil on paper

The summer studies continue with this small painting from Bass Rocks, so easy to recognize with that honey-colored glow. This one is on a rougher watercolor paper, which lends its coarse texture to the stone. I used a shellac primer so the texture wouldn’t be compromised by a heavy pigment coating.