Homage to Tectonic Time

TM9323 Homage to Tectonic Time 24×44 oil on panel

Going to the ends of the earth – it’s a phrase we all have heard and dreamed about. But I like to think of that phrase in terms of time as well. If the earth can seem both tiny and vast, then time, with its epochs and geological eras can also be incredibly deep. I was thinking about this while working on the painting. This easily climbed granite outcrop was once part of a chain of nearly alpine-sized mountains. And the sand and gravel at its feet?  Thousands of years of erosion and ice ages have humbled the mountain, building deep troughs of rubble. Remembering these processes as I pant is daunting. So much time, so many changes. It puts a different perspective on current events. Details below. Enjoy

TM9323 Homage to Tectonic Time – detail with quartz bands and eroding granite

TTM9323 Homage to Tectonic Time – close-up

TM9323 Homage to Tectonic Time – detail from foreground with sand, seaweed, and worn ledge

Homage to Tectonic Time

TM9323 Homage to Tectonic Time 24×44 oil on panel

Campobello Island is one of my favorite places. The geology is magnificent, with layers of iron rich granite, black basalt, and quartz intrusions that seem to stripe the ancient headlands. All this with views to Grand Manon and Maine. Homage to Tectonic Time is my “portrait” of a spot I like to visit early in the morning. It is wind-swept and primal. Except for erosion, it feels like it hasn’t changed since the end of the last ice age. So much history can be read in the rock. Ancient mountains. volcanic activity, changing sea levels, compression and rebound – a long story that you can touch and feel – it always sends shivers up my spine. Below are details. Enjoy.

TM9323 Homage to Tectonic Time – detail from right side with morning view to far headland

TM9323 Homage to Tectonic Time – close-up

TM9323 Homage to Tectonic Time – detail from left side showing quartz intrusions in ancient basaltic headland