Wetland Spring – Early Light

TM9413 Wetland Spring – Early Light 36×60 oil on panel

I’ve been in the studio looking at paintings on the wall drying, and stacked against the wall waiting for galleries to reopen to accept delivery of new work. It’s a conundrum. Do I continue working as if everything will resume? And how do you do that when surrounded by so much heartache? I don’t know the answer. I do know that when I looked at Wetland Spring – Early Light, I realized it might not be finished. It’s still about the season when spring and winter grasses are in a sort of equilibrium, jostling each other. Spring will eventually overcome the papery detritus of winter. but the reworked version introduced more grass, and a bit more green. Why? Maybe because living with the pandemic requires more hope (green) and more effort by many more people (the added grass). Strange. Landscapes always tell a story, including a metaphorical story.

Wetland Spring – Early Light also looks backwards to wonderful, historic Japanese screens of autumn grasses. Like life, the painting is a tapestry interweaving old and new, life and death, the world below and the world above. Details below. Nimaste.

TM9413 Wetland Spring – Early Light – detail from upper left edge with reflected cloud and grasses

TM9413 Wetland Spring – Early Light – detail from upper right

TM9413 Wetland Spring – Early Light – detail from lower center edge with reflections and grasses

TM9413 Wetland Spring – Early Light – detail from left edge with reflections and papery white winter grasses

TM9413 Wetland Spring – Early Light – detail from left of center with bright cloud reflected in shallow water, old and new emerging grasses

Earlier version of painting.

TM9413 Wetland Spring – Early Light (earlier version) 36×60

Technical painting notes: Much of the work on this painting was done with soft rubber rollers. I used the width of the roller at times, but also rolled out paint using the edge of the roller. Selective brushwork manipulated the color and added variety to the strokes.

 

 

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Up in a Tree

TM9429 Up in a Tree 42×48 oil on panel

Often, a painting can provide a place of escape and refreshment. I was thinking about this while “social distancing” and thought about the wonders of hanging out with birds in a tree, especially in October. With this in mind, I started a new painting full of bright colors, blue skies, and a few cumulous clouds – ready for a few misplaced travelers? The details below give you an opportunity to use your imagination and move inside and around the tree. Have fun.

TM9429 Up in a Tree – detail from right side with swaying branches

TM9429 Up in a Tree – detail from upper left

TM9429 Up in a Tree – detail from lower edge

TM9429 Up in a Tree – detail from upper center

TM9429 Up in a Tree – detail from left side

TM9429 Up in a Tree – detail from upper right

Technical painting notes: Most of this painting was done with soft rubber rollers, with some brushwork to define edges and add variety to the stems and branches

Hiking to the Chasm 2 & 3

TM9425 Hiking to the Chasm #2 7×7 oil on paper

TM9426 Hiking to the Chasm #3 7×7 oil on paper

More studies from Purgatory Chasm – a perfect place to wrestle with the geometry of glacial chaos!More in the works…enjoy.

 

Hiking to the Chasm

TM9424 Hiking to the Chasm #1 7×7 oil on paper

Spring is quickly arriving, and it’s time to plane field trips with my students. we are hoping to spend some time at Purgatory Chasm in central Massachusetts – sketching and photographing, observing and soaking up the dramatic tectonic and glacial chaos of this piece of geography. It is a spectacular place to paint. And a challenge. While the trees haven’t leafed out quite yet, they will soon. I will be posting sneak peaks at the coming season, and views from various points on the way to the chasm. Enjoy!

Joyful Spring

TM9423 Joyful Spring 42×48 oiil on panel

Spring is the anticipation of green, of sunlight, and of the wonderful sweet smell of moisture in the air. Joyful Spring combines those attributes with an oblique view across the wetland, filled with reflections and the straw color of winter’s grasses. I think it’s the juxtaposition of long-dormant with new that intrigues me. The neutral gray/tans of winter allowing the newly emerging yellow/greens to seem even brighter and more alive. Details below. Enjoy.

TM9423 Joyful Spring – detail from upper right corner with reflections, grasses, first signs of duckweed

TM9423 Joyful Spring – detail from upper right quadrant

TM9423 Joyful Spring – detail from upper left

TM9423 Joyful Spring – detail from lower left

Technical painting notes: I used several soft rubber rollers to apply paint – 1/4″, 1.5″, 2″, 4″. I also used silicone scrapers to draw into wet paint. These tools, plus my regular soft brushes, allowed me to vary the quality of the linework in the painting.

 

Looking Up, Looking Down

TM9422 Looking Up, Looking Down 36×60 oil on panel

Painting is an adventure. I started this painting almost two years ago – a somewhat abstract view through trees in early winter. I worked on it off and on all year, tinkering with the mood, the amount of snow. and, finally, the intensity of the wind. Eventually, the painting became a blizzard with white out conditions. I wasn’t sure a white whirling void was really my intent, so I put it away for a few weeks. When I returned to it, I knew the winter had to go. I couldn’t stand looking at the blizzard – so cold. I picked up a roller and started attacking the panel with yellows and grays, greens and blues. It certainly changed the mood! At some point, it struck me that I was painting a brilliant, partly cloudy sky, and at the same time the yellow shapes began to resemble blossoms. Oh dear, I thought. Where did that come from? I took out my collection of photos from the Victory Gardens and shots of my friend Christine’s garden and started to purposely paint the gestures of flowers and leaves. The painting is certainly about transitions and spring, and the joys of looking up and down. I think it also is about learning to trust intuition, letting go, and having loads of fun skiing along the edges of the roller shapes and dancing with the lines. Details below. Enjoy.

TM9422 Looking Up, Looking Down – detail from lower right showing layered use of brush and roller strokes

TM9422 Looking Up, Looking Down – detail from upper right

TM9422 Looking Up, Looking Down – detail from upper center

TM9422 Looking Up, Looking Down – detail from upper left with clouds and blossoms

Reflections

TM9421 Reflections 36×60 oil on panel

Reflections takes a broad look at the late spring woods on an afternoon when nearly everything is flaunting its new green. The lake is calm, the mood quiet, and full summer is just around the corner. Enjoy. Details below.

TM9421 Reflections – detail from right side with redbud tree

TM9421 Reflections – detail from lower left

TM9421 Reflections – detail from center

Technical painting notes: The painting started with a roll-up of dark umber and siennas, applied with a soft rubber roller and “disturbed” with solvents and playful re-rolling. This established the dark masses. While the paint was wet, I used a scraper to draw the trunks and branches. Further development with brush and some roller work brought the forms into focus and enlivened the color. I used an extra fine spatter technique to “glaze” color into much of the foliage.